TheWeek.com closing its comment section

More and more often I read about news websites shutting down their commenting sections. Just today it was TheWeek.com, whose explanation cited this gem of a reason for getting rid of news site comments: And so today, the smartest, most thoughtful, and most spirited conversations are being driven not by pseudonymous avatars in the comments… Continue reading TheWeek.com closing its comment section

Court orders compelling some U.S. papers to “out” anonymous commenters

Responding to a court order, a newspaper in Redding, Calif., will release contact information for an anonymous commenter on its website who may have witnessed a crime. The Record Searchlight reports that [attorneys for a man accused of attempted murder after a 2011 shootout with police have subpoenaed the commenter’s information](http://www.redding.com/news/2013/jan/30/record-searchlight-subpoenaed-for-commenters-id). The commenter posted to… Continue reading Court orders compelling some U.S. papers to “out” anonymous commenters

Wilcoxson’s moving on from Facebook flap

Wilcoxson’s, the Livingston-based ice cream company whose president drew the fury of the Internet a few weeks ago over an insensitive comment on its Facebook page, has told its online fans that it’s done talking about the matter. On the company’s restored Facebook page, it writes that while Wilcoxson’s has allowed discussion of the Sept.… Continue reading Wilcoxson’s moving on from Facebook flap

Fracking ban

A fun one from the Romenesko blog today: [The Stamford Advocate in Connecticut has banned the word “fracking” in its comment section](http://jimromenesko.com/2012/10/17/hearst-site-bans-the-word-fracking-in-comments/), citing how it’s often used as a replacement for certain versatile curse word that starts with an F. Upset is Sharon Wilson, a Texas advocate for people negatively affected by [hydraulic fracturing](http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hydraulic_fracturing), aka… Continue reading Fracking ban

YouTube hopes real names will help defeat nasty comments

YouTube is trying to get people who post comments on the video sharing site to use their real names, [according to the official YouTube blog](http://youtube-global.blogspot.com/2012/06/choosing-how-youre-seen-on-youtube.html). Starting back on June 29, the site gave users the choice of how their identity should appear. Users can pull information from their Google ID and even from their Google… Continue reading YouTube hopes real names will help defeat nasty comments